October 2021 LMIP Semi-Annual Review

ISSUE:  Lakes Management Implementation Plan Update.
RECOMMENDATION:  Management recommends the Board continue to provide input and directions on the Lake Management Implementation Plan.
BACKGROUND:  In 2012, the Board initiated a restoration plan to improve the health of the Lakes. The Board approves the Lakes Management Implementation Plan annually in January. Each month the Board is updated on the progress on Lakes Management. Additionally, the Board conducts a semi‑annual review in April and October in order to present the progress of implementation to the Community.
 
A. Works Completed to Date-  
  1. Structural Projects- Eastover Park Forebay- Week of May 3, LOWA Roads Department removed sediment, leaves, and debris, so that the forebay’s design would work adequately. Additional riprap was placed in the forebay to divert water in the appropriate direction.   
  2. Public Education- Articles were written for the Lake Currents newsletter in subjects of buoys and navigational markers in June, stormwater management in June, invasive and non-invasive species in July, and use of pesticides in August.  
  3. Dredging- Since the last semi-annual review in April 2021, Dredging Point #K4 (Keaton’s Boat Ramp), Dredging Point #K1 (Cove past the dam) and Dredging Point #K5 (Wilderness Ln Cove) were completed. Approximately, 1,320 cubic yards of sediment were removed. The typical sediment removal in a six-month period is 1,000 to 1,400 cubic yards.
  Below are the amounts of removed sediment by Fiscal Year. 
             
  1. Roadside Ditch Reconstruction/Stormwater Management Program- LOWA Roads Department’s work combined with work of annual contractors yield the following results:
      
  1. Patrick Henry Court to Small Marina Drainage Improvements Project- All five homeowners’ signatures have been obtained on the updated plats. The plats will be reviewed by Orange County Planning Services again. If the plans do not need to be revised again, LOWA will submit to Orange County courts for approval. A. Morton Thomas & Associates (AMT) are working on securing permits from the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. A. Morton Thomas & Associates (AMT) are also working on the final design.  
  2. Lakeview Parkway Ditch reconstruction (3909 to 3913) was completed week of October 4 by construction contractor BZ Excavating. The contractor excavated and removed 260-feet of 15" corrugated metal pipe on the west shoulder of the roadway from 3909 to 3913 Lakeview Pkwy. A concrete drainage inlet in front of 3911 Lakeview Pkwy was removed as well. The contractor reconstructed 260-feet of roadside ditch after removing the metal pipe system.
  3. Water Quality- LOWA staff completed all annual, quarterly, and monthly water quality testing thus far in FY2020/2021, including nutrient monitoring, physico-chemical monitoring, and bacteriological monitoring.
  4. Aquatic Plant Management- Preliminary spring survey of submerged aquatic vegetation took place in May 2021. No new problem areas were identified.
B. Works in Progress-
  1. Structural Projects- Flat Run Forebay- LOWA dredge operator will remove sediment, leaves, and debris once the new barge is delivered.
Eastover Forebay will have new millings laid around the perimeter after Chemung is finished with the paving project.
  1. Roadside Ditch Reconstruction/Stormwater Management Program- LOWA Roads Department will continue to reconstruct roadside ditches in need under the direction of the Stormwater Inspector, Environmental Resources Manager, & the Director of Facilities.
  2. The Crossover Pipe Replacement Project- JP Tucker Excavating will begin work in November 2021 (weather permitting). The five crossovers included in this project are located near 139 Madison Cir., 306 Birchside Cir., near Edgehill Dr mail station, Lakeview Parkway and Mt. Pleasant Dr., and Monticello Cir and Jefferson Dr.
  3. Lakeview Parkway Ditch Reconstruction- JP Tucker Excavating will begin work in November 2021 (weather permitting). Approximately 250-feet of roadside ditch will be reconstructed and lined with riprap.  
  4. Patrick Henry Court to Small Marina Drainage Improvements Project- The five plats will be reviewed by Orange County Planning Services again and submitted to Orange County courts. A. Morton Thomas & Associates (AMT) are working on securing permits from the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. A. Morton Thomas & Associates (AMT) are also working on the final design. LOWA attorneys will develop Deeds for the easements.
  5. Golf Course Fairways 12 and 15- Both projects on Golf Course Fairways 12 and 15 will begin Week of November 1, 2021 (weather permitting). This project will address the pipe failures and sink holes on the courses.     
  6. Public Education- Environmental articles will continue to be written for the Lake Currents newsletter. LOWA will continue to promote local resources and organizations for members to utilize.
  7. Grant Funding- Additional grants will continue to be sought and applied for to aid in the funding of projects, when LOWA qualifies for available grant funding.
  8. Dredging- LOWA will deploy the new CAT 306 dredging equipment at Flat Run Forebay and then continue with the dredging schedule on Keaton’s Lake.
  9. Water Quality- LOWA staff will conduct annual, quarterly, and monthly water quality testing throughout 2021.
  10. Fisheries/ Habitat Management- Bluegill Sunfish, Redear Sunfish, Black and White Crappie Sunfish, and forage minnows were stocked in the Main Lake and Keaton’s Lake during July and September.  
  11. Aquatic Plant Management- Submerged aquatic vegetation survey was conducted by A. Morton Thomas & Associates (AMT) during the 2021 Lakes and Stormwater Management plan study. Results will be given to LOWA and the Board of Directors in November 2021.
C. State of the Lakes-
The following is a brief overview of the health of the lakes as indicated from water quality data collected in 2021/2022.
The Main Lake and Keaton’s Lake typically score well in most water quality standard tests. However, both Lakes do not typically score well when it comes to nutrient level testing for Nitrogen and Phosphorus. Both Lakes typically score poorer than the Environmental Protection Agency’s water quality standards for Total Nitrogen and Total Phosphorus. Our Lakes consistently have an overabundance of nutrients Nitrogen and Phosphorus. An excess in nutrients like Nitrogen and Phosphorus can turn into Eutrophication, which can cause problems like algae blooms and fish kills from low oxygen in the water. While average concentrations of Nitrogen and Phosphorus have improved or maintained relatively the same since the implementation of the 2012 Lakes Management Plan, we still have a way to go. In this time frame, 313 new houses were built in LOW. Every time a new house is built, the majority of the lot becomes impervious to rain and stormwater runoff absorption, as the rain doesn’t absorb into the ground at the lot where the rain falls as it did before, but instead, because the majority of the lot is now covered with impervious surfaces such as the new house, driveway, sidewalk, shed, etc., causes increased stormwater runoff to our Lakes. Increased stormwater runoff brings additional sediments and excessive nutrients like Phosphorus and Nitrogen to our Lakes. Without the implementation of the Lakes Management Plan, suspended sediments in our Lake waters, and Phosphorus and Nitrogen levels would have increased continuously. Our Lakes Management Implementation plan helps mitigate the continued loss of pervious soils due to continued new construction. The Lakes Management Implementation Plan contains multiple pieces that each aid in the overall plan of pollution reduction to our Lakes.  
  1. Main Lake- Over the past three years, Total Nitrogen has been higher than the recommended EPA standard of 360 micrograms per liter. During this time, the Main Lake has averaged 1.83 times the EPA standard. Last year, the Main Lake averaged 1.74 times the EPA standard. The four seasonal samplings in FY2019 averaged 682 micrograms per liter. In FY2020, levels decreased to average 614 micrograms per liter. In FY2021 levels increased to an average of 692 micrograms per liter. Over the past three years, Total Phosphorus has also been higher than the recommended EPA standard of 20 micrograms per liter. During this time, the Main Lake has averaged 2.2 times the EPA standard. Last year, the Main Lake also averaged 2 times the EPA standard. The four seasonal samplings in FY2019 averaged 38 micrograms per liter. In FY2020 levels increased to an average of 55 micrograms per liter. In FY2021 levels decreased to an average of 36 micrograms per liter. (See tables on Page 8.)
  2. Keaton’s Lake- Over the past three years, Total Nitrogen has been higher than the recommended EPA standard of 360 micrograms per liter. During this time, Keaton’s Lake has averaged 2.8 times the EPA standard. Last year, Keaton’s Lake averaged 2.5 times the EPA standard. The four seasonal samplings in FY2019 averaged 909 micrograms per liter. In FY2020, levels decreased to an average of 852 micrograms per liter. In FY2021 levels increased to an average of 894 micrograms per liter. Over the past three years, Total Phosphorus has also been higher than the recommended EPA level. Keaton’s Lake has averaged approximately 2.7 times the EPA standard. Last year, Keaton’s Lake also averaged 2.7 times the EPA standard. The four seasonal samplings in FY2019 averaged 51 micrograms per liter. In FY2020 levels increased to an average of 56 micrograms per liter. In FY2021 levels decreased to an average of 54 micrograms per liter. (See tables on Page 9.)
  3. Both Lakes- Over the past three years, Chlorophyll-a results in both lakes remain below state threshold levels; no reason for concern.  (See table on Page 10.)
  4. Physical Properties- The Environmental Resources Manager provides the following analysis of physical properties key measures.  (See table on Page 11.)
  • pH: Within the standards for aquatic life.
  • Dissolved Oxygen: DO levels fluctuate in both lakes as water temperatures change seasonally. DO is at acceptable levels in both Lakes.
  • Temp: Both Lakes are within the acceptable level.
  • Secchi Depth: Main Lake is within the standard.  Keaton’s Lake water clarity has improved since the implementation of the Lakes Management Plan.
  • Conductivity: Acceptable level for both lakes. General standard for lakes is 50-1500µS/cm. (2014, Teton Science)
  • Turbidity & TSS: Acceptable level for both lakes.  General standard for turbidity is 10-50 NTU (2004, EPA.)  Keaton’s Lake has higher levels on average than the Main Lake; this is expected given the lower Secchi Depth readings on Keaton’s Lake.
  • The dark line separating 8/14/2014 and 11/4/2014, marks the completion of the 13th Fairway Stream Restoration project. The dark line separating 12/19/2016 and 5/10/2017, marks the completion of Eastover Park Water Quality Retrofit project. The dark line separating 5/29/2019 and 7/31/2019, marks the completion of the 14th Pond Retrofit with Forebay project. The dark line separating 5/12/2020 and 7/21/2020, marks the completion of the Flat Run Forebay project. Total suspended sediment results, and turbidity results are both lower on average (less cloudy, murky water, which is desirable) since completion of these pollution reducing projects. Secchi Depth results have increased on average (more transparent, clearer water to greater depths, also desirable) since completion of these projects. In 2017, we did not need to treat Keaton’s Lake for harmful blue-green algae, after having at least two algaecide treatments per year from 2013-2016. In 2018, Keaton’s Lake was treated once for blue-green algae. In 2019, Keaton’s Lake was treated once for blue-green algae. In 2020, Keaton’s Lake was treated once for blue-green algae. Thus far in 2021, Keaton’s Lake has not needed treatment.
 
e.   Outlook - Further improvement of water quality results can be achieved through construction of additional sediment & nutrient removing structures, continued reconstruction of eroding roadside ditches and public education. Public education in maintenance of stormwater drainage ditches which help prevent erosion of soils to our Lakes, the use of only phosphorus-free fertilizer, and help prevent leaves, grass, and pet waste from being an excessive nutrient transported through stormwater runoff in roadside ditches and stormwater drainage ditches on members lots that flow to our Lakes, will continue to be emphasized.
 
Nutrient/Sediment Reduction
Location TP (lbs./yr.) TN (lbs./yr.) Sediment (tons/yr.) Watershed
13th Fairway 29.61 115.42 64 Keatons Lake
Eastover Park 13.145 63.303 1.76 Keatons Lake
14th Pond 5.2 38.6 2.17 Keatons Lake
Flat Run Forebay 415 2456 372.48 Main Lake
8.3 Miles Ditch Reconstruction 350.72 701.18 306.77 Keatons Lake
5.8 Miles Ditch Reconstruction 244.99 489.98 214.37 Main Lake
 
 
             





Nutrient Levels: (Phosphorus, Nitrogen, & Chlorophyll-α)
ML- Average Total Nitrogen Concentrations

ML- Average Phosphorus Concentrations

 
KL- Average Total Nitrogen Concentrations

  KL- Average Phosphorus Concentrations ML & KL- Chlorophyll-α
 


 
Physical Properties
Posted: 10/25/2021 10:27:44 AM by Nick Blankenship, Environmental Resources Manager | with 0 comments